Talking heads rolled their eyes at the 2012 Seahawks draft class

The 2012 Seattle Seahawks Draft Class produced a 1st-round pick that scouts called a reach for the pick.

Rookie Bruce Irvin, the look says it all. Photo by Brett Bivens

Bruce Irvin may have been a reach in late April, but now that it is early January 2013 he’s far from a reach.  Having played in all 16-games for the Seahawks this year Irvin has flown under the radar, but don’t let that effect the way you view him. In those 16-games he’s piled up 8 sacks, which is a team record for a rookie defensive player in the category, and forced one fumble.

I’ll be the first to admit when I’m wrong, and I was wrong on Draft night in April. When the pick of Irvin flashed my initial reaction was “WHAT?!” I wanted a guy by the name of Chandler Jones.  Someone I had watched over the past 3-years in college and knew his potential, but I didn’t factor in the truth and that’s Irvin fits Seattle’s defensive scheme, Jones on the other hand wouldn’t have. I was wrong to have second guessed Pete Carroll and John Schneider and that’s the reason I’m a member of the 12th Man and not the Front Office.

The 2nd-round selection in Bobby Wagner reminded me of another MLB selected by the Seahawks a few years back-Lofa Tatupu a small guy, but has the ability to guide his teammates and contribute to their success. He’s proven his case with 140 tackles, 2 sacks and 3 interceptions as well as his name being thrown around as a candidate for Defensive Rookie of the Year.

Hopefully unlike Tatupu his success in Seattle lasts longer than his six-years with the team in which he appeared in three Pro Bowls-all in his first three-years in the league.

Just like Lofa, Wagner has a young core of Linebackers near him in KJ Wright, Malcolm Smith and Mike Morgan. Tatupu came in with one of Wagner’s teammates in 2005-Leroy Hill.

The Seahawks 3rd-round pick was a Quarterback by the name of Russell Wilson, a QB that scouts called “too small to be able to start in the NFL.”

Wilson can’t hide his 5’11 frame, but he hasn’t let it get to him. To open the season Wilson was named starting QB for the Seahawks over free-agent signee Matt Flynn. Jon Gruden compared him to Drew Brees and stated throughout the pick if he was still a head coach he would have been selected way before his selection in the 3rd-round.

The Jaguars, Bills and Chiefs all passed on Wilson as the Jaguars selected a Punter with their pick in the 3rd-round and since then Wilson has started every game for the Seahawks completing 64% of his passes for 3,118-yards and 26 Touchdowns-tying the NFL Rookie Record for touchdown passes by a quarterback by the name of Peyton Manning. He’s led the Seahawks to an 11-5 record and four game-winning drives (defeated the Chicago Bears in OT). Did I mention he can scramble as well? Wilson rushed for 489-yards and scored on the ground four times for the Seahawks.

His selection in the 3rd-round is the reason he’s being overlooked by some as a Rookie of the Year underdog behind his opponent he’ll take on Sunday in Washington-Robert Griffin III.

Wilson has shown he will be playing for years to come as a starting QB in the NFL and hopefully will be a cornerstone for the Seahawks as they continue their success with such a young team in the NFL.

Robert Turbin was selected in the 4th-round and viewed as a workhorse that down the road should be able to lessen the load on Marshawn Lynch in the backfield and he’s proven just that. In 16-games he rushed for 354-yards averaging 4.4 per carry, while also having 181-yards receiving. He’s shown at times his hands aren’t the best when he’s receiving, but through the season has shown he’s improving in that category and will be a vital part as teams try to wear out Lynch in the playoffs-something easier said than done.

Breno Giocomini teaches rookie JR Sweezy during training camp. Photo by Brett Bivens

The Seahawks final six-picks in rounds 4-7 have all contributed in role situations, but each one has shown he has potential to develop. CB Jeremy Lane (6th-round pick) and OG JR Sweezy (7th-round pick) have each started 3 games apiece and appeared in 13-games with the Seahawks.

Lane has piled up 15 tackles and Sweezy has shown he has done a nice job of transitioning from defensive line in college to the offensive line in the pro’s.

Jaye Howard watching Clinton McDonald during drills at training camp. Photo by Brett Bivens

DT Jaye Howard (4th-round pick) has appeared in two-games for the Seahawks-not accumulating any stats.

LB Korey Toomer (5th-round pick) is currently on the Practice Squad/Injury designation and hasn’t played a game for the Seahawks.

SS Winston Guy (6th-round pick) appeared in two-games for the Seahawks and recently just got activated after being suspended four-games for violating the NFL Substance Policy.

DE Greg Scruggs (7th-round pick) has played in 11-games for the Seahawks piling up 6 total tackles-5 of them himself as well as 2 sacks and a pass deflection for the Seahawks. He’s shown he can get involved in a core that already consists of Chris Clemons, Red Bryant and Irvin.

After the NFL Draft the Seahawks were awarded many negative reviews, some even called them the loser of the Draft, but as the Seahawks suit up Sunday in Washington it’s easy to argue that they’re far from the losers of the 2012 NFL Draft.

Very few teams have their top picks contribute right off the bat let alone throughout their career, but the Seahawks have found players that fill roles and blossom off of them. To have only 1 player not appear in a single game for the team that drafted them their rookie year is something you don’t see often and if you do it’s unusual to see a successful team.

That’s not the case with the Seahawks and if these players keep progressing as they have through their rookie year who knows where they will end up once their careers dwindle down. For the Seahawks however they’ve proven to have been more successful than a majority of the teams in the 2012 Draft and each one of their selections has shown they will contribute.

They’ve also shown that I shouldn’t question Carroll and Schneider’s decisions in the future as well as the rest of the world.

Written by Zach Bellerdine